About your Search

20130801
20130831
STATION
CSPAN2 14
CSPAN 9
KNTV (NBC) 4
MSNBCW 3
CNN 2
CNNW 2
KQED (PBS) 2
KPIX (CBS) 1
MSNBC 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WBFF (FOX) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 45
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
. she was married to another man. they ran away to the mississippi area and live together. he claims that they were married. campaign, and became a big issue and jackson never got over it. all of her life, she was embarrassed by it. she smoked a pipe. she was an excellent plantation manager. on the public side of things, no. she was very hurt by it. judge overton, a best friend of the family, wrote an essay about the scandal of not being married. they did remarry. he invited them to marry. that theyton said went to mississippi and, as they say, they were married. he would not go any further than that. >> what andrew jackson do after his term? had his wife tossed emily. she died in the second administration. oversaw the margaret o'neill scandal. known of loose morals married a member of the cabinet. they would not accept or. -- her. she had authority. the women would not call on her or receive her. mrs. jackson was not treated that way. but, peggy was not a very nice person. >> national. ille.shv jackson died 1828. he is writing to his friend and he describes the onset of rachel's ill
of several historical novels he spoke for a little more than an hour in jackson, mississippi. >> the reason for me to be in jackson maybe more so than any other is what took place 40 miles west of here and that is what i want to talk about tonight. at vicksburg, so this is quite a story and even some people around here don't know it. that is great fun for me but i need to start out talking about something that i always mention whenever i'm doing any event like this. i am quite sure that at least some of you have some interest in the civil war for one reason, because at of some time many years ago perhaps you read a book called the killer angels. every time i say that i see people nod their heads. you have no idea what the killer angels is that's okay. it's not required. i'll explain it to you quickly. the killer angels was written by my father and came out in 1974. it is the story of the battle of gettysburg. now with the killer angels is not is the history of the battle of gettysburg. it's not a history book. it's the story as told to you from the characters themselves and not just any cha
. and then mississippi burning. wait until you hear hal scarpa senior is the gatt this of the mississippi burning portrayed in that movie which they happen. scarpa see at various nicknames. they call them the killing machine. he reveled in this. he felt that he had a license to kill. he would sign notes cayenne, killing machine. they called him the grim reaper, hannibal lector, the mad hatter. he had various names. he stopped counting after 50 murders, which makes him the most prolific killer in the history of cosa nostra, bar none and it makes him one of the top zero colors of all time, by the way. anyway, he only did 30 days in 30 years in prison. why? because from 1962 forward he was the top echelon criminal informants for the fbi. his briefing memos went directly to j. edgar hoover himself. over the years three separate organized crime strike forces, one in newark, one in chicago, one in brooklyn tried to put them away. could people are trying to get this mad dog killer of the street. other members of the fbi you are protecting him and keeping it on the street. these are a couple of the homic
to go south of richmond. just the way i was cultivated and mississippi was a scary place because emmitt till was murdered there. and i still remember ibm blacked and when we go together i wonder what people think and all day ever say is come back. i remember you from your service and never sure president. but i was a little gun shy with how i was brought up but we had a wonderful time. >> calling on the republican line. >> caller: with a race race, every time a black person kills a white person and it is o.k. but if a white person kills a black person they set out it is a race. it is not race all the time. we are past all that we need to except people who they are and quit complaining. >> guest: who is complaining? >> caller: the blacks always complain. >> guest: whitey think we're always explaining our circumstances? >> caller: they just complain get over the past. >> guest: you are from the south. you're from the south to the seveners get over the loss of the confederate war of the state's? >> caller: i am past that. the south lost. >> host: can you give us a little bit of your histor
separation of the mississippi river basin from the great lakes, hoping against hope to stop the advance of one very aggressive fish, a fish that is just one part of a far bigger problem. our cover story is reported now by mark strassman. >> reporter: meet the king of the illinois river. >> wow. reporter: and a big show-off. mask lar. ... muscular. very muscular. >> reporter: i mean, this thing will hurt you. >> yes, yes. it can jump out of the water at high speeds. they can jump a great distance out of the water, up to eight feet out of the water. >> reporter: fast, easy to startle, and voracious eaters, asian silver carp are a jarring sight here and a hit on youtube tube. but fisheries research scientist greg sass says in the long history of this water way what's also remarkable is when this fish got here. just 20 years ago. >> by the mid 2000's it was becoming a crisis. not only were fish jumping everywhere but what was showing up in our catches, the amount of asian carp versus the native fishes. >> reporter: just amazing how wide it is. with no natural predators in this stretch of th
the mississippi. >> sort of. >> rose: to memphis, or somewhere. >> well, i can't explain it. this is just music that touched me from the very first moment i heard it. i was very, very young, and i believe it was a willy dixon record, but i'm not sure. but i heard this sound, this sort of wonderful sliver of light broke through between a minor third and a major third-- and i later investigated what that actually means. i didn't even know it at the time. and i just-- it made me shiver. it was almost like an electric shock. and i realized this is where i wanted to live. i wanted to be in that space and hear these sounds and these stories knowing, of course, that i'm monumentally unsuited for the task. you know, i'm not from here. this is not my music. >> rose: before we talk about "house," where did you grow up? >> i grew up in ox horde, england, home of the blues-- it's not the home of the blues. ( laughs (. >> rose: maybe oxford, mississippi. >> yes, i grew up in oxford. >> rose: your dad was-- >> he was a doctor. >> rose: your moment? >> she was-- she raised four children. >> rose: of which you
to go back. all of that plus breaking news. there was a miracle today in oxford, mississippi. reinforced with scratch- resistant glass and a unibody made kevlar strong. okay google now. call my droid. the new droid ultra by motorola. when strength matters, droid does. ♪ the joint is jumpin' osteo bi-flex® helps strengthen your joints.° like calcium supplements can help your bones, osteo bi-flex can help your joints.° osteo bi-flex... the best stuff in the joint.™ now in joint and muscle formula. >> shepard: u.s. senator ted cruz says nothing against canada but is he an american. he was indeed born in canada but his mother is a u.s. citizen. he says he actually has dual citizenship both countries. now he plans to give up the canadian citizenship. senator cruz recently won a straw poll of 2016 conservative denver. made two trips to iowa. home of the nation's first in the nation presidential contest and staffers say this week is he planning to visit new hampshire. the first primary state san diego mayor bob filner is trying to settle a sexual harassment lawsuit against him from the c
, mississippi. and many may relate to that. the death of those three civil rights workers there. but you also relate the fact that there was many others all across the great state of mississippi and in other southern states who sacrificed as well. and so share some of your opinions on the ideal of galvanizing the college youth. >> we followed the tradition as college students of young people and college students all over the world. when you talk about changing the social order, it is usually the young people, the young, educated people who will generally spear that particular change. -- spearhead that particular change. so we followed that same historical tradition. when, we know about the three civil rights workers who were murdered, but during that same period from june, i think, through september a total of 7 other blacks -- 27 other blacks, young black males, were murdered in mississippi. i related the you the story of two students at alcorn college who were just coming back to the campus from downtown, and two carloads of klansmen kidnapped them, and they found be their bodies, i think,
lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s, you know, who lived there? well, as i was driving, you looked closer, there was puffs of smoke coming from the roof. it was not someone who lived there. someone was still living here in the year 2002, 2003. one day, myself and matt black, a photographer who, you know, is kind of a modern day dorothy lang, evans, we pulledded off the side of the road, came over the railroad tracks across this little dirt road here, across from this vineyard, and we pulled up to the shack. it was in better shape then, but a tarp paper shack, and as we walked up, there were rabbit furs that had been -- that were hammered on to the wall. i remember knocking once, twice, and this place was on stilts. the door creeked open, and there stood this black man who looked like he'd been lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s. he had a stutter. in fact, later he told us that he came west with a stutter, one state at a time. his name was james dixon, 95, he was living here and had since the 40s. he was part of the migration of blacks who did something that no blacks in ameri
, mississippi and several other places. >> julian, do you remember? >> several people supporting the march were asked to donate staff to the march and i was donated to the march on washington committee. got john's speech, the original speech -- that went to members of the press who were seated down below lincoln. i passed out the copies of john's speech. i pointed out to them that john would be the only speaker speaking that day to talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people. i thought and we thought this demonstration showed how different we were and superior we were to the other civil rights organizations. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? vix i meant aggressive. i did not mean anything harmful. i have always been upset by people who say "oh, you are so militant." it is not equate abu with violence. it just means someone aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. i thought we were more militant than the other groups gathered there. >> what was the magic of dr. king? martin luther king jr., more than any other leader of our times, had the capacity and the to define, but
mississippi on sunday turning roads into rivers. flooding has not been this bad since hurricane katrina in 2005. >>> in england, outrage grows after the partner of newspaper reporter glenn greenwald is detained under a uk terrorism act. david miranda was released after nine hours of questioning. this is according to "guardian" newspaper. no charges were filed but cell phone and other items were confiscated. greenwald works for the guardian newspaper and broke the story of the secret surveillance programs in the united states. >>> in other news, a new week of trading on wall street and stocks are expected to open flat. investors take a breath following two weeks of losses. ringing the opening bell this morning, representatives from american corporate profits. there they are, just about to ring the bell. >>> one-on-one with the future king. prince william sat down with max foster opening up about parenthood for the first time since the birth of his son, george. of course, the prince talked about that moment he walked out of the hospital with his wife and his son to that incredible media f
are graduates from syracuse which are fifth and shepherd smith went to you have the of mississippi which was 14th and hemmer went to university of ohio which was 16th. do you know what this means? >> no. >> todd kelly is stocking all of them. >> true. that is an interesting and completely pointless list. >> greg, your senior year was a blur, right? >> my four years was a blur. >> what senior year? >> i actually cleaned up. my first two years were nothing but drinking and bad grades. and then i realized if i wanted a job i had to become -- i cleaned it up. boy that was a boring story. i expected something funny to come out of my mouth and instead it was just a little spit. coming up, ralph maccio is dead -- set against making a karate 4. he probably can't lift his leg past this point. i kid. what is this? a 15-ton ball of fat? i think i have died and gone to 15 ton ball of fat heaven. >>> was it a proper greeting for a player's cheating? on monday alex rodriguez made his season debut shortly after mlb suspended him for using performance enhancing drugs. and he wasn't met with cheers as i had pre
as "operation plunder dome" and plead by an fbi agent named dennis who was originally from mississippi. and he lead the investigation that ultimately resulted in buddy's conviction. after a trial people said you'll never be able to convict buddy. in a city buddy went to prison with 67% of the voters thinking he did a good job even though they thought he was guilty. when he was sentenced, the judge talked about how he was two people. he was dr. jekyll and mr. hyde app and buddy said privately to a friend later, how come i didn't get two fing paycheck. what he was kicked of racketeering and conspiracy being kind of knowing about it but not actually being physically involved in the underlying act. and buddy kind of framed it as what did i do and i was convicted of being the mayor. some of the jurors i spoke to felt otherwise that he was a guy who knew how to keep himself insulated like a mob boss he once prosecuted, ironically. and that was able to stay out of the direct line, but that he knew everything that was going on. he was the kind of guy one juror told me who know how many rolls of toilet
in meridian, mississippi in an integrated school. and went to school at university of alabama at a very integrated campus and at a campus that in the 1980s was actually handling racial issues a lot better than a lot of campuses across the northeast. but martin luther king not only did for america but what he did for his home region of the south, a region that had been scarred by racism and racial tensions for years. to see how quickly things -- he gave this speech the year i was born in a segregated south and segregated america. by the time i started first grade in meridian mississippi it w was integrated. that is nothing short of extraordinary and that is a legacy that we put first at the feet of martin luther king and also all the civil rights workers and protesters and leaders who gave their all to make sure that white children like myself and black children who were my friends, who i played football with in first grade and baseball with in first grade, would go to school together. that was the normal. that was normal for me. let me -- al, let me go to you quickly here. it is incredi
tempore: the gentleman yields. for what purpose does the gentleman from mississippi rise? >> mr. speaker, unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> mr. speaker, i'm not a fan of government mandates, and neither are my constituents in mississippi. but there is one mandate that the people of mississippi sent me to washington with, to repeal, replace, dismantle, delay, and defund obamacare. i have heard from families, small businesses, and hardworking americans across my district who all have the same message -- this law is a train wreck. mr. palazzo: that is why one of my very first votes in congress was to repeal obamacare. that's why i voted to repeal it nearly 40 times over the last three years. that is why i introduce add constitutional amendment to restore the right of the american people to refuse this bad law. that is also why i firmly believe we must defund obamacare in a continuing resolution this body will take up later this year. i believe this is a fight worth fighting for mississippi. and
jersey, albany, new york, alexandria, virginia, and as far south as carolina and mississippi, and as far west as kentucky. more specialized knowledge association devoted to manufacturers, improvements in agriculture, the study of natural history. there was even a military philosophy society founded at west point. these all of your as well. these groups were invariably local or regional in scope and if you look at the names, they almost always have at least a town or city a solution within and often a province. it was very specific to the early precursor to the american philosophical society with a number of names that include something like the philosophical society of the society for advancement of useful knowledge or practical knowledge held in philadelphia in the province of pennsylvania. and from our perspective when you read this, it is sort of silly but it's important to understand in 18th century thinking, knowledge and its pursuit was a personal face-to-face experience. it had to be done locally. had to be done through face-to-face, through lectures. you have to have members need
the mississippi, and these were all designed from large mural paintings that you can find in the rotunda of the capitol in washington. but these were only used on the very first series and were never used on notes after the 1880's. john: so this is all still "legal tender?" mark: all legal tender. everything the federal government has issued since 1861 still retains its legal tender status. however, all of these notes have a premium value to collectors and you wouldn't want to actually want to spend them. plus, i can't imagine if you took a large note into any store that anybody would be willing to accept it. they'd all think it was counterfeit. john: so a five dollar bill from this period could be worth as little and as much as what? mark: a note from a big city, from new york or philadelphia, might be worth as little as $25, $30, $40. notes from really rare towns, or territories, or places that are highly collected and very few notes available, could be worth upwards of tens of thousands of dollars. john: mark, they say it's only money, but to me this is a very special array of currenc
but a few structures of the mississippi river valley and the reoccupied western tennessee. in the east ready lee led his ragtag confederate forces, the army of northern virginia to one victory after another of their opposite number. but the victories were all one on virginia soil. and in feeble, the virginia economy even as they defend it. he knew better than any southerner that the confederacy's resources or to limited to keep fending off the confederacy's enemies in definitely. only by carrying the war into the union states and only by leveraging of war weariness public into peace negotiations can the confederacy hope to win. but this was by no means a far fetched up. in the fall of 1862 dissension over president abraham lincoln's emancipation proclamation had cost unhappy voters in new york and new jersey to install democratic governors they're come a new round of anti-war democratic candidates to were due to run in the fall of 1863 governors' elections in ohio and pennsylvania. if those states also turned against the war they could force of abraham lincoln either to begin peace talks or
to where we're dealing with the rainy weather in mississippi. tupelo today, scattered storms in the forecast. yes, your blue suede shoes, elvis from tupelo, mississippi. the worst of the weather by far right over the top of kansas city. if you're down from interstate 70 or down to arkansas that's where the heavy rain will be from showers and storms. we're looking dry in the west. this weather pattern hasn't changed for three or four weeks. hot and dry in the west and in the east relatively cool and every now and then just like >> good morning.g y.ppy monda the sun breaking out with spotty showers possible. >>> that's your monday forecast. savannah, david. >> thank you so much. coming up next, trending, while the name sake of amelia earhart recreating her flight has explaining to do this morning. >> tracy morgan will give us a tour of his shark themed man cave. it's outrageous. first, these messages. to help pay for the road trip... before they earned 1% back on all purchases -- everywhere, every time -- and 2% back at the grocery store... even before earning 3% back on gas, w
watches and warnings up and down the mississippi river. they're getting better and subsiding. we're seeing this heavier rain off the coast of florida. while it's helping to fuel some thunderstorms the threat exactly from tropical depression dorian is becoming less of an issue as it will take this turn northeast. it will move out to sea north of bermuda. temperature wise 102 in dallas. 76 in chicago. tomorrow looks even cooler. temps in the new england area should only be in the mid-70s with late day thunderstorms. the showers that we're seeing in the northeast won't last all that much longer. we could squeeze out sunshine. most of next week temperatures look nice and comfortable. nothing too hot and nothing too cool in the northeast. >> that sounds like tend of a goldilocks story. >>> i talk to a leading crime fighter on the unintended consequences of stop and frisk policies. >>> the woman who accuses the san diego mayor of harassment. okay, a? b? b. a? that's a great choice. let me show you some faucets to go along with that. with the latest styles and guaranteed low prices, you can turn
on the mississippi, which was not quite as good as what mark twain portrayed in his book, but after doing that for a year, he teamed up with another american of german dissent named ben mast, and together they went to work in a flour mill in st. louis, and they did that for about a year; then they moved to illinois where they worked on a farm for three years, and in 185 p -- 1853 after hearing the great stories about the gold rush in california, they decided to make the move west, and they did this by buying 200 head of livestock driving them from st. louis to california, and turns out that could be a profitable venture things even back then were more expensive in california than they were in st. louis. you could buy a cow or ox for five or ten dollars in st. louis, and the same animal cost $50 or more in california. it was a profitable trip for them. they arrived in dayton, nevada in 1853, and they immediately went to work panning for gold in the carson river the next day. they did this for about three years working gold, operating a sleuth box for mixed results. some days very profitabl
into mississippi, it was pretty horrible. it was not all blamed on sherman. it was the collapse of the cotton market. the english went to india, egypt for cotton the last few years of the blockade, it broke them. 6000 union soldiers elected to settle in new orleans. it was not all like "gone with the wind." it was coming back, but it was a different culture. it would not be agricultural. it would not have that until later in the 19th century. host: the north was in the midst of a great big industrial revolution. the days of the big financiers on wall street. tell us about what was happening there. guest: thanks in part to the machinery of war. guest: it was a continuation of the war and an expansion, and they were getting ready for the centennial of the nation and showing off the advances that had been made in the past 100 years. most of those were technological advances, the old farming equipment to the new modern technology, transcontinental railroad, transportation was bringing people closer together, making it much easier to get cross-country. host: here are a few of the big things that h
by the church in philadelphia, mississippi, a worker from boston was beaten to death. the day of this demonstration we have six people shot in washington the same day. black americans right now, young people, we lose 3000 every six months. we have a 9/11 every six months. over 4000 died in 40 years of lynching. we could lose more than that in one year. the priorities that we have are not racism. just because i say that i need tires for my car, my mother gots heart surgery, we have to establish priorities. because i spend my resources helping my mother does not mean i do not need tires. the challenge we face is we are going to give voice to the least of all its children as a measure of our effectiveness and leadership? [applause] the answers will come by going sufferingommunities of problem, and finding out not from the 70% of the households that are raising children, dropping out, but what is happening in the 30% of the households of the people who are not dropping out of school, in jail, on drugs. we just rolled a young lady in going toin teske, college, and for years she has
's go down to where we're dealing with the rainy weather in mississippi. tupelo today, scattered storms in the forecast. yes, your blue suede shoes, elvis from tupelo, mississippi. the worst of the weather by far right over the top of kansas city. if you're down from interstate 70 or down to arkansas that's where the heavy rain will be from showers and storms. we're looking dry in the west. this weather pattern hasn't changed for three or four weeks. hot and dry in the west and in the east relatively cool and every now and then just like this mor >>> thanks, bill. 8:07 now. taking a live look at the golden gate bridge, what you can make out here. i can tell you right now the low clouds are going to be with us for most of the daylplp in san francisco, but you will get gel a couple of bits ofÑi sunshine. most comfortable conditions right around the innerq xdbay. 75 for instance in oakland. then the heshu is on as we head through tomorrow climbing by 90s return wednesday. upper 90ed by >>> that's your monday forecast. savannah, david. >> thank you so much. coming up next, trending, while
we're looking at some heat in texas on into the mid-mississippi river valley. 90s in interior sections of the southwest. some showers making their way from northeast new england on into the ohio valley. monsoonal moisture into the >>> 8:08 only a thursday morning. good morning, i'm meteorologist christina loren. temperatures are warming up nicely. we are at 64 right now in sunnyvale. 61, san jose, 61 to kick off the day in livermore. as we take you through the hour by hour changes, about 77 in livermore, 65 in oakland. so, running about three to five degrees cooler this afternoon. also, you will probably notice less humidity out there, so it feels more true to the temperatures that we are accustomed to here in the bay area this time of year. hold onto those norms as we get into the upcoming weekend. >> and that's your latest weather. matt? >> all right. al, thanks so much. more new of our exclusive conversation with california kidnapping survivor hannah anderson as she speaks out for first time. nbc's national correspondent kate snow is out in san diego. good morning again. >>
. louisiana, mississippi, what is happening in some of those states? >> that is an important point, one of the interesting demographic changes in america over the last 25 years. the expert we will hear from later. traditionally, immigrants have gone to the south, other than -- shunned the south, other than texas. that has been a problem. now, you are seeing dixie really attracting a lot of the immigrant states like north carolina. one of the states with the biggest percentage increase of immigration over the last 15 years has been georgia. it has become a high-growth state. people at, are immigrants more attracted to a state with high welfare benefits, or are they attracted to a state that has jobs? we look at some of the evidence, and what we found was, on balance, immigrants are much more likely to go to states with unemployment rates than they are to go to states with welfare. they are coming here because they want a job, not a welfare check. >> it makes logical sense. if you are to leave your country and make out somewhere new -- >> there are so many people on the other side of the
in madison, mississippi, thank you for holding on. you're on booktv on c-span2 with melanie phillips. >> caller: thank you for taking my call. ms. phillips, i've enjoyed you today. and as i was listening to you, um, i kept thinking of hypocrisy, abuse, double standards -- some of of which you talked about. some of the standards that you, um, are talking about today are great indeed, but certainly everybody wasn't given an opportunity to live by those standards. your, the caller before talked about how do we return to those standards, and i think the right needs to start by cleaning up their own house. if you have double standards, hypocrisy and abuse of power, people are going to reject those notions outright in anybody who espouses those beliefs. so until the right can clean up their own house and make sure that -- and while they have righteous indignation, let it be across the board. you know, i can hear you if your righteous indignation is only for those things that affect what's in your best interests and not in my best interests. so i wondered if you could comment on that. >> ho
of your competitors are holding strong. host: gulfport, mississippi, steve on our republican line. caller: i just wanted to make a couple of comments. one, i'm happy that the department of justice is trying to keep this merger from occurring. but the biggest problem that the airline industry has is that they have terrible, horrible customer service. they ou pay for a ticket, do not guarantee the plane will take off on time, they don't guarantee the plane will arrive on time, and if you happen to be landing in an airport where you have to switch from one airplane to another airplane, they don't even guarantee that they'll land on time and give you now time to get to the second departure or second leg of your trip on to your destination. the biggest problem the airline industry has is a total lack of customer service or customer concern, and that is why there aren't as many people flying as there should be, and that is why they are now charging for things like a bag, ok, if you bring a bag with you, they now charge you for that, and they're nick and he will diming everybody to death, if you
of the mississippi, 800 square miles right here in the middle of california. these cotton growers from the south were chased out by the bull weasel, came last and they claim this land, this blakely and. they took the rivers and dams them and shoved to the flow to places where they wanted to go cotton. at some point they had to go find labor. a number of folks came to the basin and their nerd is played out here. quite okies, bitchiness and black okies. no one had ever written about lack okies. they came in the 40s when this cotton picker was started in the fields. it could take the middle swath of the fields in the 40s and 50s, but it could not take the edge of the rows. so the black okies were working across the machine that would eventually idle them, picking the edges of the cotton and in 10 years time they were idled. the women ended up becoming mates and housekeepers for wealthy white farmers, much like the south. and the men, where they occurred, found work. many of them were idled. the children left this place. when we came upon it, it was mostly old folks. when i wrote my last book, west of th
will show you pictures, this is gulfport, mississippi. six inches of rain fell alone there yesterday. you can see flooding the streets, stranding so many drivers. flood watches and warnings are in place all the way from the florida panhandle northward to the carolinas. people trying to leave a church in gulfport either had to wade through the waist-deep water or wait for it to recede. south florida, rip currents very, very dangerous. police report 50 rescues. in fact, an elderly couple drowned. >>> families are being told to get out as this incredibly dangerous wildfire scorches the community of sun valley, idaho. the fire has grown to more than 100,000 acres. much of this part of the country home to a lot of pricey property. you have actor tom hanks, bruce willis, they have places there. then the fire crews, 1200 firefighters working tirelessly to gain ground on the flames, trying to save the thousands of homes still in this fire's path. academy award winning actor richard dreyfuss is among those expressing gratitude to the fire crews. this was his tweet. the beaver creek fire is ravagin
, mike. >> fremont festival, biggest outdoor festival west of the mississippi. over here, biggest pain on the east bay area, the bay bridge toll plaza. the cash rains are all backed up, the fast track lanes, big advantage, get a fast track transresponder in the possibility of that strike on monday as well with b.a.r.t. shut down. look toward the eastshore freeway, traffic lighter, no problems on the berkeley curve, merge with folks off of 580, that you have slowing, the map shows the slow downs in the area, not so bad, ashby avenue the worst and 2r5d digsal any time of clay, you go, through downtown berkeley, nice smooth flow off the berkeley curve and take you to westbound highway 4, still slow in antioch and a crash that's clearing. back to you, janelle. >> thanks so much, mike. thanks for joining us. see you in a half an hour. ♪ >>> welcome back. >> what is that song? >> wow. >> you like it? >> yeah, sure. >> there's a best in the world. >> of course they are popular. but when you were a kid there were poppy bands that you listened to. >> that's true. >> new kids. >> new kids. >>
of frank sinatra. ms. cel-- mississippi kelley's most recent book, "capturing camelot." very well photographed, obviously, and very well put together. personally, these picture books mean a lot more to me when the captions are well researched and thought out and a bit more prose than you would normally find which is what ms. kelley did with this book. never failing to raise a few eyebrows while uncovering stories and doing such a wonderfully painful job of reminding us our heroes are very, very human, please welcome to the festival kitty kelley. [applause] >> the only part of that introduction that isn't quite right is the prolific. it takes me four years -- >> i heard it from someone. >> no, you've got to be careful. [laughter] prolific as a turtle. it takes me four years usually on each book. but this one, this book was a labor of love because stanley tretick was one of my very best friends, and he was one of president kennedy's favorite photographers. and i used to go visit stanley in washington. and one time i asked him what he had in the marine corps locker that he used as hi
north georgia, mississippi, we'll have storms. we'll dry it out in areas like missouri who desperately need it. we leave you with the shot of washington, d.c. let's get the ball rolling. along the jersey shore, coca-cola is partnering with local businesses and the seaside heights business improvement district to restore the historic boardwalk, welcoming beach lovers back with a refreshed and revitalized place to get out, get moving, and have some fun in the sun. it's part of our goal to inspire more than three million people to rediscover the joy of being active this summer. see the difference all of us can make... together. the last thing i want is to feel like someone is giving me a sales pitch, especially when it comes to my investments. you want a broker you can trust. a lot of guys at the other firms seemed more focused on selling than their clients. that's why i stopped working at my old brokerage and became a financial consultant with charles schwab. avo: what kind of financial consultant are you looking for? talk to us today. [ laughing ] ...is the crackle of the campfire. it c
euphemism mississippi appendectomy to give voice to the experience of poor black women in the south who were sterilized against their knowledge, an issue that has been in the news in the last couple of of weeks in hell of vonya and lastly i want to offer for you the black and the party was a health social movements. the black panther movement is a rorschach test for how we think about blacks politics in the last 20th century in particular but what we don't appreciate so much is that they were deeply engage and involved in issues of health activism health equality and access to medical care services in the united states. in particular as i discussed in my book they were engaged in getting people information to access to services that were under mentioned that we didn't know enough about, that the services were underutilized or not provided enough for such as sickle cell amenia -- a mania -- sickle cell anemia. harry its prior look that many of you probably know medical apartheid the black panther party was engaged in protecting black minis from overexposure to the bad forces of medical experi
a barge down the mississippi, tanker cars, or trucks. >> there's a story that was first report bid the hill newspaper saying that the e he on would likely be uld -- >> that's actedly not a new storyifment that came out a couple years ago and was investigated. and my understanding is there were no conflicts found. what you're starting to see is a recycling of a lot of events. keep in mind that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite cross-border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this is now taking longer again, we could have built the empire state building five times by now, we completed world war ii in less time. so at some point you start to say, we've had four studies. we've had this, we've had that. at some point the question is has this policy really been high jacked or are we still on path? > eric from our democrat's line. >> we have environmental studies. we've also had practical xperience with spills. i don't know where o you're getting your safety record from, the 99.999%. if one of these pipelin
for the heart, mind and body. >> otis ezell is from new albany mississippi. loves oranges. eats one every day. i think that's good. 102 years old. and we have adele schwartz. she is from freehold, new jersey. she is 100 years old today. a very devout optimist. she says everything is good. the glass is half full always. washington state is the home of james itami. he is 100 years old today. loves boats. crazy about boats. had one almost all of his life. that's it. now back to new york where they have lots of boats in the hudson river, the east river and all the rivers and routes. new york, new york. >> all right. willard. thanks a lot. it is back to school time. coming up next, we'll help you save money on those costly apps with all the tech gear your kid needs to get back to school. >> and coming up, a live concert from chris brown. but first, this is "today" on nbc. >>> we're back at 8:37 and we're wrapping up our special series back to school today bargain bonanza. stocking up on tech gear can add up quickly. how can you get what you need at the right place? enter mario armstrong. he is today'
. where are you from, columbus, where? >> mississippi. >> is that your sister? is she cool. >> okay. look at this next segment. i'm going to show you cool stuff for school. getting ready to go back to school. some kids are back in class. do they have everything they need and want, must haves. amy goodman is here. amy good woman is what i should say. >> i love that. pleasure to be here. >> they want cool stuff but don't break our bank account. >> the latest and greatest. there are a lot of wonderful sales this weekend as well. starting off with the super neat backpacks. this is actually for a younger set, preschoolers or kindergartners. because it has a case inside the backpack which makes the kid a superhero. i call this super fly. my toddler darting out the door in the morning, takes him forever. now he's going to fly. >> that's cool. >> seven different signs. great for boys and girls. >> just under $40. >> where can you get them? >> super me hero.com website. >> you like them? i like them. >> people still use lunchboxes. >> everything vintage is new again. this is from our era. annivers
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)